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» Hazardous Storage » Hazardous Material Storage » Transbank Chemical Storage Cabinets

Transbank Chemical Storage Cabinets

Transbank Chemical Storage Cabinets
Transbank Chemical Storage Cabinets
Transbank Chemical Storage Cabinets

TransBank Chemical Storage Bins 
 

These Transbank Chemical storage containers offer a cost effective chemical storage solution.

All chemicals should be stored safely in a lockable container.

The TransBank Chem range complies with all legislation regarding the storage of chemicals in the back of a vehicle or in a fixed location.

These chem safes are designed around the sizes of chemical containers to optimise the use of space in side the unit.

The Bright Yellow colour and warning signs give a clear differentiation between fuel storage and chemical storage.

For the transportation of fuels - please see our TransBank fuel range of containers 921-031.

 

Specifications:

  • Ventilated to prevent build up of fumes
  • Overcentre catch with padlock facility
  • Finished in Bright Yellow with relevant warning signs
  • Fixing points to secure to the floor or a vehicle
  • Suitable for Chemical Storage
    * Delivered prices to most UK destinations - (excludes Scottish Highlands and all British Islands)


Capacity per unit:

  • 921-036: Total Capacity 20L / Sump Capacity 15L
  • 921-037: Total Capacity 50L / Sump Capacity 30L
  • 921-038 Total Capacity 120L / Sump Capacity 50L
 
 
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Price: £133.50
Prices from: £126.82
SKU Capacity External Dimensions Internal Dimensions Weight Price Qty.
921-036 20L W420 x D410 x H350mm W350 x D350 x H345mm 14Kg £133.50  £126.82 +VAT Minus Plus
921-037 70L W530 x D485 x H540mm W445 x D415 x H510mm 20Kg £206.25  £195.94 +VAT Minus Plus
921-038 70L W880 x D485 H540mm W790 x D415 x H510mm 27.5Kg £284.18  £269.97 +VAT Minus Plus

Transbank Chemical Storage Bins

TransBank Chemical Storage Cabinets from Armorgard


 1. LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STORING FLAMMABLES AND CHEMICALS

 2.0 LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STORING FLAMMABLES AND CHEMICALS
The storage of chemicals, flammable substances and gases is the subject of many regulations. Some substances must be stored outside away from buildings. Others can be stored inside but are sometimes subjected to quantity limits. We would always recommend that you should seek the advice of the Health and Safety Inspectorate, your local Fire Officer, Trading Standards Office or any other qualified body.
Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974
This Act is concerned with securing the health, safety and welfare of people at work and with protecting those who are not at work from risks to their health and safety arising from work activities. The Act and its relevant statutory provisions also deal with controlling the storage and use of explosives and highly flammable or otherwise dangerous substances. The general duties in sections 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 of this Act apply to all the work activities which are the subject of this guidance book. The Act is enforced either by HSE or by local authorities as determined by the Health and Safety (Enforcing Authority) Regulations 1989. Guidance on the Act is contained in an HSE publication entitled A guide to the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992
These Regulations require all employers and self-employed persons to assess the risks to workers and others who may be affected by their undertakings so that they can decide what measures need to be taken to fulfill their statutory obligations. These Regulations also require an assessment to decide on appropriate health and safety arrangements, health surveillance, emergency planning, and the provision of information and training. An Approved Code of Practice gives guidance on the provisions of these Regulations. Highly Flammable Liquids and Liquefied Petroleum Gases Regulations 1972
These Regulations apply when liquids which have a flashpoint of less than 32°C and which support combustion (when tested in the prescribed manner) are present at premises subject to the Factories Act 1961. The Regulations include provisions for these highly flammable liquids relating to:
precautions to be taken during storage; precautions to be taken against spills and leaks; controls for sources of ignition in areas where accumulations of vapours might occur; means to prevent the escape of vapours; dispersal of dangerous concentrations of vapours; controls on smoking.
An exception to the storage requirements of these Regulations applies where a petroleum license is in force. Highly flammable liquids defined by these Regulations are included in the scope of this guidance document. Factories Act 1961
The Act defines a 'factory' and contains many general and detailed provisions relating to work activities in factories. Section 31(3) contains specific requirements relating to the opening of plant that contains any explosive or inflammable gas or vapour under pressure, and Section 31 (4) contains specific requirements relating to the application of heat to plant that has contained any explosive or inflammable substance. 'Inflammable' means able to burn with a flame and 'flammable' is generally taken to have the same meaning as 'inflammable'. Inflammable substances and vapours will include flammable liquids and their vapours as defined in this guidance document.
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Petroleum (Consolidation) Act 1928
The Act defines petroleum and petroleum spirit and requires the keeping of such liquids (except for small specified quantities) to be authorised by a license, and to be in accordance with any conditions of the license. The Petroleum (Mixtures) Order 1929 extends these requirements to petroleum mixtures which are defined in the Order. Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) regulations 1994
These Regulations, commonly referred to as the CHIPS Regulations, contain requirements for the supply of chemicals. The Regulations require the supplier of chemicals to:
classify them, that is, identify their hazards; give information about the hazards to the people they supply, both in the form of labels and safety data sheets; package the chemicals safely.
Classifying chemicals according to the CHIPS Regulations requires knowledge of physical and chemical properties, including the flashpoints of liquids, and of health and environmental effects. Chemicals are grouped into three categories of danger, according to their flashpoints:
extremely flammable - those liquids with a flashpoint lower than 0°C and a boiling point lower than or equal to 35°C; highly flammable - liquids which have a flashpoint below 21°C but are not extremely flammable; flammable liquids - liquids which have a flashpoint equal to or greater than 21°C and less than or equal to 55°C and which support combustion when tested in the prescribed manner at 55°C.
Flammable, highly flammable and extremely flammable liquids "are all included in the scope of this guidance book. The Regulations are supported by an Approved supply list containing agreed classifications for some common substances, an approved classification and labeling guide, an Approved Code of Practice on safety data sheets and by the guidance publication CHIP 2 for everyone. Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail (Classification, Packaging and Labeling) Regulations 1994
These Regulations apply to the transportation of dangerous goods by road and rail. Their aim is to reduce the hazards involved in transporting such substances by requiring them to be correctly classified, and packaged and labelled according to that classification. They specify that dangerous substances should be carried in suitable containers which will not leak under normal handling; these should bear appropriate warning labels giving information on the nature of the hazards. Two associated documents, the Approved carriage list and the Approved methods for the classification and packaging of dangerous goods for carriage by road and rail provide assistance to enable compliance with these Regulations. Flammable liquids classified as dangerous substances by these Regulations are those liquids which have a flashpoint of 61°C or below (with certain exceptions based on their combustibility) or liquids with a flashpoint above 61°C carried at temperatures above their flashpoint. Flammable liquids defined in this guidance will be included in the scope of these Regulations. Road Traffic (Carriage of Dangerous Substances in Road Tankers and Tank Containers) Regulations 1992 and the Road Traffic (Carriage of Dangerous Substances in Packages etc) Regulations 1992
These Regulations complement the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail (Classification, Packaging and Labelling) Regulations 1994. Their provisions include requirements for:
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the construction of vehicles; information to be received by operators and to be given to drivers; the marking of vehicles; the loading, stowage and unloading of consignments.
Dangerous substances are those materials included in the Approved Carriage List produced in association with the 1994 Regulations or with the characteristic properties defined in Schedule 1 of those Regulations or Schedule 1 of the road tanker Regulations. The 1992 road tanker Regulations define a flammable liquid as having a flashpoint of 55°C and below, but these will be revised to bring the classification into line with the above 1994 carriage Regulations. Flammable liquids defined in this guidance will be included in the scope of these Regulations. Electricity at Work Regulations 1989
These Regulations impose requirements for electrical systems and equipment, including work activities on or near electrical equipment. They also require electrical equipment which is exposed to any flammable or explosive substance, including flammable liquids or vapours, to be constructed or protected so as to prevent danger. Advice is available in HS(R)2530. Notification of Installations Handling Hazardous Substances Regulations 1982
These Regulations require premises with specified quantities of particular substances, such as 10 000 tonnes or more of flammable liquids with a flashpoint of less than 21°C to be notified to HSE. Following the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Act 1990 and Regulations 1992. the presence of NIHHS Schedule 1 substances and quantities, together with some from CIMAH Schedule 347, on, over or under land requires consent from hazardous substances authorities. Similar provisions also apply in Scotland.
Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1984 as amended 1989/90
These Regulations apply at two levels to certain premises where specified quantities of particular substances are stored or used, such as flammable liquids with a flashpoint below 21°C and a boiling point (at normal pressure) above 20°C. The main aim of these Regulations is to prevent major accidents occurring; a secondary objective is to limit the effects of any which do happen. A major accident is a major emission, fire or explosion resulting from uncontrolled developments which leads to serious danger to people or the environment. The first level requirements apply at premises where 5000 tonnes or more of flammable liquids, as defined above, are involved in certain industrial activities, including processing operations and storage. The second level requirements apply where 50 000 tonnes or more of flammable liquids are involved. The general requirements apply at both levels and require the person in control of the industrial activity to demonstrate that the major accident hazards have been identified and that the activity is being operated safely. The additional requirements that apply at the second level include the submission of a written safety report, preparation of an on-site emergency plan and provision of certain information for the public. HS(R)21 gives guidance on these Regulations.
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1994
These Regulations require employers to assess the risks arising from hazardous substances at work and to decide on the measures needed to protect the health of employees. The employer is also required to take appropriate action to prevent or adequately control exposure to the hazardous substance. Substances covered by the Regulations include carcinogenic substances and those which, under the Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 1994, are labelled as very toxic, toxic, harmful, corrosive or irritant. The Regulations also cover dusts, where present in substantial quantities, and those substances assigned occupational exposure limits. Flammable liquids
normally have toxic or harmful properties which bring them within the scope of these Regulations.
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Safety Signs Regulations 1980
These Regulations contain requirements for safety signs giving health and safety information or instructions to people at work (except for certain circumstances described in the Regulations) to comply with Part 1 of BS 5378. A Safety Signs Directive (92/58/EEC) to be implemented by European Community Member States will result in these Regulations being replaced by the new Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations. The Directive lays down a requirement to provide, maintain and use a sign when risk assessment has indicated the need for a sign to warn of a hazard that cannot be prevented or controlled effectively by other means. Annexes I to VII of the Directive contain details of appropriate signs. Generally, the signs that are included in BS 5378 will meet the requirements of the Directive.
Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 199262
These Regulations implement a European Community Directive and aim to ensure the provision of safe work equipment and its safe use. They include general duties covering the selection of suitable equipment, maintenance, information, instructions and training, and they also address the need for equipment to be able to control selected hazards. Regulation 12 is particularly relevant to equipment associated with flammable liquids. It requires employers to ensure that people using work equipment are not exposed to hazards arising from:
equipment catching fire or overheating; the unintended or premature discharge of any liquid or vapour; the unintended or premature explosion of the work equipment or any substance used or stored in it
Guidance on these Regulations is available in an HSE publication entitled Work equipment.
Fire Precautions Act 1971
This Act controls what have become known as the 'General Fire Precautions', covering the means of escape in case of fire, the means for ensuring the escape routes can be used safely and effectively, the means for fighting fires, and the means for giving warning in the case of fire; and the training of staff in fire safety. The Act allows the presence of flammable liquids to be taken into account when considering general fire precautions. The Act is enforced by the Fire Authorities and further guidance can be found in a Home Office publication entitled Guide to fire precautions in existing places of work that require a fire certificate - factories, offices, shops and railway premises.
Fire Certificate (Special Premises) Regulations 1976
These Regulations apply at premises where certain quantities of hazardous materials are processed, used or stored. For flammable liquids they apply at premises where there is a total of more than 4000 tonnes of any highly flammable liquid (as defined by the Highly Flammable Liquids and Liquefied Petroleum Gases Regulations 1972) or more than 50 tonnes of any highly flammable liquid held under pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and at a temperature above its boiling point. Where these Regulations apply they take the place of the Fire Precautions Act 1971 and designate HSE as the enforcing authority for matters relating to general fire precautions.
Dangerous Substances (Notification and Marking of Sites) Regulations 1990
The purpose of these Regulations is to assist the fire-fighting services by the provision of advance and on-site information on sites containing large quantities of dangerous substances. The Regulations apply at sites containing total quantities of 25 tonnes or more of dangerous substances. Dangerous substances include flammable liquids with a flashpoint below 55°C as defined by this guidance document. The Regulations require suitable signs to be erected at access points and at any locations specified by an inspector, and notification to the appropriate fire and enforcing authorities of the presence of any dangerous substances. HS(R)29 gives further guidance.
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REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING References
1 Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 SI 1999/3242 HMSO 1999 ISBN 0 11 085625 2
2 Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 Ch 37 HMSO 1974 ISBN 010 543774 3
3 Highly Flammable Liquids and Liquefied Petroleum Gases Regulations 1072 ST 1972/917 HMSO 1972 ISBN 0 11 020917 6
4 Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations 1994 SI 1994/3247 HMSO 1994 ISBN 0 11 043877 9
5 Petroleum (Consolidation) Act 1928 Chapter 32 HMSO 1928 6 Petroleum (Mixtures) Order 1929 HMSO 1929 ISBN 0 11 100031 9 7 Environmental Protection Act 1990 HMSO 1990 ISBN 0 10 544390 5
8 HSE Safety datasheets for substances and preparations dangerous for supply Guidance on Regulation 6 of the CHIP Regulations 1994 Approved Code of Practice L62 HSE Books 1995 ISBN 0 7176 0859 X 9 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1994 SI 1994/3246 HMSO 1994 ISBN 0 11 043721 7 10 HSE Storage of packaged dangerous substances HSG71 HSE Books 1998 ISBN 07176 14840 11 HSE The storage of flammable liquids in containers HSG51 HSE Books 1998 ISBN 0 7176 1471 9 12 British Standards Institution Safety signs and colours BS 5378: 198013 13 American National Standards Institute Standard B31.3 Chemical plant and petroleum refinery piping (with addenda) 1 1981 addenda to ANSI/ASME B31.3 - 1990 edition (AWSI/ASME) 2 1982 addenda to ANSI/ASME B31.3 - 1990 edition (AWSI/ASME B31.3b - 1980) 14 Engineering Equipment and Material Users Association Supplement 153 to ANSI/ASME B31.3 1989 15 British Standards Institution Specification for pipe supports BS 3974: 1974
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16 British Standards Institution Specification for identification of pipelines and services BS 1710: 1984 17 British Standards Institution Code of practice for accommodation of building services in ducts BS 8313:1997 18 British Standards Institution Code of practice for the selection, installation and maintenance of electrical apparatus for use in potentially explosive atmospheres BS 5345: 1989 (in 8 parts) 19 European Code of Practice Electrical installations in potentially explosive gas atmospheres (other than mines) prEN 50154 (also published under the same title as International Standard IEC 79-14) 20 British Standards Institution Flame arresters for general use BS7244:1990 21 HSE Health and safety in motor vehicle repair HSE Books 1991 HSG67 ISBN 0 7176 0483 7 22 Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 SI 1989/635 HMSO 1989 ISBN Oil 096635 X 23 Institution of Chemical Engineers Electricity and flammable substances: A short guide for small businesses ISBN 0 85 295250 31989 24 British Standards Institution Code of practice for earthing BS 7430:1998 25 British Standards Institution Code of practice for the control of undesirable static electricity BS 5958 Part 1: 1991 General considerations Part 2 : 1991 Recommendations for particular industrial situations 26 British Standards Institution Specification fur lined industrial vulcanised rubber boots BS 5451: 1989 27 British Standards Institution Specification for lined lightweight rubber overshoes and overboots BS7193: 1989 28 HSE Diesel-engined lift trucks in hazardous areas PM 58 HSE Books 1986 ISBN 0 11 883535 1 29 HSE The cleaning and gas freeing of tanks containing flammable residues CS 15 HSE Books 1985 ISBN 0 7176 1365 8 30 HSC Oil Industry Advisory Committee Guidance on permit-to-work systems in the petroleum industry HSE Books 1991 ISBN 07176 1281 3 31 HSE Occupational exposure limits EH 40/2002 HSE Books 2002 ISBN 07176 2083 2 32 HSE Spraying of highly flammable liquids EH 9 HSE Books 1977 ISBN Oil 8830341
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33 HSE Evaporating and other ovens HSG16 HSE Books 1981 ISBN Oil 883433 9 34 General COSHH ACoP, Carcinogens ACoP and Biological agents ACoP:Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regs 1999 HSE Books 1999 ISBN 0 7176 1670 3 35 HSE Dangerous maintenance - a study of maintenance accidents and how to prevent them HSE Books 1992 ISBN 0 11 886347 9 36 HSE Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road and Rail (Classification, Packaging and Labelling) Regulations 1994 SI 1994/669 HMSO 1994 ISBN 0 11 043669 5 37 HSE Road Traffic (Carriage of Dangerous Substances in Road Tankers and Tank Containers) Regulations 1992 SI 1992/743 HMSO 1992 ISBN 0 11 023743 9 38 HSE Road Traffic (Carriage of Dangerous Substances in Packages, etc) Regulations 1992 SI 1992/742 HMSO 1992 ISBN 0 11 023742 0 39 Environmental Protection (Duty of Care) Regulations 1991 SI 1991/2839 HMSO 1991 ISBN 0 11 015853 9 40 Controlled Waste (Registration of Carriers and Seizure of Vehicles) Regulations 1991 SI 1991/1624 HMSO 1991 ISBN 0 11 014624 7 41 HSC Management of health and safety at work. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 Approved Code of Practice L21 HSE Books 1999 ISBN 0 7176 2488 9 42 Home Office and Scottish Office Fire Precautions Act 1971 Ch 40 HMSO 1971 ISBN 0 10 544071X 43 Fire Certificates (Special Premises) Regulations 1976 SI 1976/2003 HMSO 1976 ISBN 0 11 062003 8 44 British Standards Institution BS 5306 Code of practice for fire extinguishing installations and equipment on premises Part 1: 1976 Hydrant systems, hose reels and foam inlets Part 3: 2000 Code of practice for the selection, installation and maintenance of portable fire extinguishers 45 Fire Services Act 1947 Ch 41 HMSO 1947 ISBN 0 10 850109 4 46 British Standards Institution BS 5908: 1990 Code of practice for fire precautions in the chemical and allied industries TSRN 0 58 018205 3 47 Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1999 SI 1999/743 HMSO ISBN 0 11 082192 0 48 HSE Emergency planning for major accidents: Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations HSG191 HSE Books 1999 ISBN 07176 16959
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49 Health and Safety (Enforcing Authority) Regulations 1989 SI 1989/1903 HMSO 1989 ISBN 0 11 097903 6 50 HSE A guide to the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 HSE Books 1992 ISBN 0 7176 0441 1 51 Factories Act 1961 Chapter 34 HMSO 1961 ISBN 0 10 850027 6 52 HSE Approved supply list and database - CHIP 2 L61 ISBN 07176 0858 1 53 HSE CHIP 2 for everyone HS(G)126 HSE Books 1995 ISBN 07176 0857 3 54 HSE Approved carriage list: Information approved for the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous goods for carriage by road and rail L57 HSE BOOKS 1994 ISBN 0 7176 0745 3 55 HSE Approved requirements and test methods for the classification and packaging of dangerous goods for carriage. Carriage of Dangerous Goods (Classification, Packaging and Labelling) and Use of Transportable Pressure Receptacles Regulations 1996 L88 HSE Books 1996 ISBN 0 7176 1221 X 56 HSE Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 HS(R)25 HSE Books 1989 ISBN 0 7176 1602 9 57 Notification of Installations Handling Hazardous Substances Regulations 1982 SI 1982/1357 HMSO 1982 ISBN 0 11 027357 5 58 Planning (Hazardous Substances) Act 1990 HMSO 1990 ISBN 010 541090 X 59 Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 1992 SI 1992/656 HMSO 1992 ISBN 0 11 023656 4 60 HSE A guide to the Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazards Regulations 1984 HS(R)21 HSE Books 1990 ISBN 0 11 885579 4 61 Safety Signs Regulations 1980 SI 1980/1471 HMSO 1980 ISBN Oil 007471 8 62 Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 SI 1998/2300 HMSO 1998 ISBN 0 11 079599 7 63 HSE Work equipment Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 Guidance on Regulations L22 HSE Books 1998 ISBN 07176 1626 6 64 Home Office/Scottish Home and Health Department Guide to fire precautions in existing places of work that require afire certificate - factories, offices, shops and railway premises HMSO 1993 ISBN 0 11 341079 4
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65 Dangerous Substances (Notification and Marking of Sites) Regulations 1990 SI 1990/304 HMSO 1990 ISBN 0 11 003304 3 66 HSE Notification and marking of sites Dangerous Substances (Notification and Marking of Sites) Regulations 1990 HS(R)29 HSE Books 1990 ISBN Oil 885435 6 67 British Standards Institution BS 476 Fire tests on building materials and structures (in various parts) 68 Institute or Petroleum Model code of safe practice in the petroleum industry Part 15: Area classification code 1990 ISBN 0 47 192160 2 Further reading British Standards institution BSEN 671:1995 Specification for fire hose reels (water) for fixed installations Chemical Industries Association Guidelines for bulk handling of ethylene oxide 1983 Chemical Recovery Association Code of Practice for the recovery of flammable solvents 1977 Drinks National Industry Group Storage and handling of high strength potable alcohol Fire Protection Association Compendium of fire safety data Volume 2 Industrial and process fire safety HSE The storage of flammable liquids in tanks HSG176 HSE Books 1998 ISBN 07176 14700 HSE Dispensing Petrol: Assessing and controlling the risk of fire and explosion at sites where petrol is stored and dispensed as fuel. HSG146 HSE Books 1996 ISBN 0 7176 1048 9 The Petroleum - Spirit (Plastic Containers) Regulations 1982 SI 1982/630 HMSO ISBN 0 11 026630 7 HSE Approved guide to the classification and labelling of substances and preparations dangerous for supply - CHIP 2 LI 00 HSE Books 1995 ISBN 07176 0860 3 HSE The storage and handling of organic peroxides CS 21 HSE Books 1991 ISBN 07176 2403 X HSC Fire safety in the printing industry HSE Books 1992 ISBN 0 11 886375 4 HSE Glass reinforced plastic vessels and tanks: Advice to users PM 75 HSE Books 1991 ISBN 0 11 885608 1 While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the references listed above, their future availability cannot be guaranteed. HSE priced and free publications can be obtained by mail order from HSE Books. HSE priced publications are also available from good booksellers. www.hsebooks.co.uk British Standards are available from: 389 Chiswick High Road, London W4 9AL Tel: 020 8996 7000 Fax: 020 8996 7001